stephenfrancoeur:

Pull quote: “That said, that this information comes second or third-hand does concern me. I don’t know for a fact that Joe Murphy is a sexual predator. Do you? Here’s what I do know. Did he creep me out when I interacted with him? Yes. Did he creep out other women at conferences? Yes. Did he behave like an entitled jerk at least some of the time? Yes. Do many people resent the fact that a man with a few years of library experience who hasn’t worked at a library in years is getting asked to speak at international conferences when all he offers is style and not substance? Yes.”

talesofdrunkennessandcruelty:
Neil Gaiman: ‘Terry Pratchett  isn’t jolly. He’s angry’
He will rage, as he leaves, against so many things: stupidity, injustice, human foolishness and shortsightedness, not just the dying of the light. And, hand in hand with the anger, like an angel and a demon walking into the sunset, there is love: for human beings, in all our fallibility; for treasured objects; for stories; and ultimately and in all things, love for human dignity.

Well worth a read.

talesofdrunkennessandcruelty:

Neil Gaiman: ‘Terry Pratchett isn’t jolly. He’s angry’

He will rage, as he leaves, against so many things: stupidity, injustice, human foolishness and shortsightedness, not just the dying of the light. And, hand in hand with the anger, like an angel and a demon walking into the sunset, there is love: for human beings, in all our fallibility; for treasured objects; for stories; and ultimately and in all things, love for human dignity.

Well worth a read.

(via ooksaidthelibrarian)

"The three rules of the Librarians of Time and Space are: 1) Silence; 2) Books must be returned no later than the last date shown; and 3) Do not interfere with the nature of causality."

— Terry Pratchett, Guards! Guards! (via ooksaidthelibrarian)

(Source: bottleonthebookcase, via ooksaidthelibrarian)

"Uncertainty is always uncertain, but the difficulty with people who rely on systems is that they begin to believe that nearly everything is in some way a system and therefore, sooner or later, they become bureaucrats."

— Lu-Tze, in Terry Pratchett’s Raising Steam, p 102 (via justjohn-jj)

(via ooksaidthelibrarian)

(Source: onna4, via ooksaidthelibrarian)

"

Franz Kafka, the story goes, encountered a little girl in the park where he went walking daily. She was crying. She had lost her doll and was desolate.

Kafka offered to help her look for the doll and arranged to meet her the next day at the same spot. Unable to find the doll he composed a letter from the doll and read it to her when they met.

"Please do not mourn me, I have gone on a trip to see the world. I will write you of my adventures." This was the beginning of many letters. When he and the little girl met he read her from these carefully composed letters the imagined adventures of the beloved doll. The little girl was comforted.

When the meetings came to an end Kafka presented her with a doll. She obviously looked different from the original doll. An attached letter explained: “my travels have changed me… “

Many years later, the now grown girl found a letter stuffed into an unnoticed crevice in the cherished replacement doll. In summary it said: “every thing that you love, you will eventually lose, but in the end, love will return in a different form.”

"

May Benatar, Kafka and the Doll: The Pervasiveness of Loss

For me there are two wise lessons in this story: Grief and loss are ubiquitous even for a young child. And the way toward healing is to look for how love comes back in another form. - May Benatar

(via mercurieux)

(Source: easyreadingisdamnhardwriting, via niwandajones)

manticoreimaginary:

The Library of Celsus

Built in honor of the Roman Senator Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus in Ephesus, Anatolia (now Selçuk, Turkey), the library was built to store 12,000 scrolls and to serve as a monumental tomb for Celsus. Celsus is buried in a sarcophagus beneath the library, in the main entrance.

Construction was between 117-120 AD, and the building is important as one of the few remaining examples of an ancient Roman-influenced library. It also shows that public libraries were built not only in Rome itself but throughout the Roman Empire.

The interior of the library and all its books were destroyed by fire in the devastating earthquake that struck the city in 262. Only the facade survived. 

(Source: Wikipedia, via niwandajones)

tramampoline:

This is a weird trilogy

(via niwandajones)

"

Are we living a life that is safe from harm?

Of course not. We never are. But that’s not the right question. The question is are we living a life that is worth the harm?

"

— Cecil Gershwin Palmer (episode 46 - Parade Day)  (via harlequinngirlraven)

(Source: spoopyravenstrash)