"Uncertainty is always uncertain, but the difficulty with people who rely on systems is that they begin to believe that nearly everything is in some way a system and therefore, sooner or later, they become bureaucrats."

— Lu-Tze, in Terry Pratchett’s Raising Steam, p 102 (via justjohn-jj)

(via ooksaidthelibrarian)

(Source: onna4, via ooksaidthelibrarian)

"

Franz Kafka, the story goes, encountered a little girl in the park where he went walking daily. She was crying. She had lost her doll and was desolate.

Kafka offered to help her look for the doll and arranged to meet her the next day at the same spot. Unable to find the doll he composed a letter from the doll and read it to her when they met.

"Please do not mourn me, I have gone on a trip to see the world. I will write you of my adventures." This was the beginning of many letters. When he and the little girl met he read her from these carefully composed letters the imagined adventures of the beloved doll. The little girl was comforted.

When the meetings came to an end Kafka presented her with a doll. She obviously looked different from the original doll. An attached letter explained: “my travels have changed me… “

Many years later, the now grown girl found a letter stuffed into an unnoticed crevice in the cherished replacement doll. In summary it said: “every thing that you love, you will eventually lose, but in the end, love will return in a different form.”

"

May Benatar, Kafka and the Doll: The Pervasiveness of Loss

For me there are two wise lessons in this story: Grief and loss are ubiquitous even for a young child. And the way toward healing is to look for how love comes back in another form. - May Benatar

(via mercurieux)

(Source: easyreadingisdamnhardwriting, via niwandajones)

manticoreimaginary:

The Library of Celsus

Built in honor of the Roman Senator Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus in Ephesus, Anatolia (now Selçuk, Turkey), the library was built to store 12,000 scrolls and to serve as a monumental tomb for Celsus. Celsus is buried in a sarcophagus beneath the library, in the main entrance.

Construction was between 117-120 AD, and the building is important as one of the few remaining examples of an ancient Roman-influenced library. It also shows that public libraries were built not only in Rome itself but throughout the Roman Empire.

The interior of the library and all its books were destroyed by fire in the devastating earthquake that struck the city in 262. Only the facade survived. 

(Source: Wikipedia, via niwandajones)

tramampoline:

This is a weird trilogy

(via niwandajones)

"

Are we living a life that is safe from harm?

Of course not. We never are. But that’s not the right question. The question is are we living a life that is worth the harm?

"

— Cecil Gershwin Palmer (episode 46 - Parade Day)  (via harlequinngirlraven)

(Source: ravenstrash)

libraryadvocates:

mylifeinthelibrary:

hatpire:

mylifeinthelibrary:

hatpire:

tamorapierce:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

Amazon is searching for all kinds of ways to get little chunks of change out of readers, isn’t it?

I actually rather like this plan. The idea of being able to put a new book on my Kindle from anywhere in the world at any time of day (or night) is awesome.
I love paper books and libraries, but I read much more on my Kindle.

Becky, I feel like I should point out that your library allows you to download ebooks to your kindle from anywhere in the world at anytime as well…for free. And your library in particular has two ebook services.
My main complaint with the new Kindle plan is they’re selling it like it includes all ebooks, but it actually only applies to a very small percentage of their offerings. It’s a restricted catalog.

Whaaaaaaaaat.
I am clearly outdated in terms of my library knowledge. I need to get on top of this shit, stat.

Just go to the library’s website, open the side menu* and click on elibrary. It has links to both services there and I think there are instructions you can download as well. If not, I can walk you through it or you can stop in at the library and anyone in adult services will be happy to help.

What services does your library offer that you might not know about? Visit their website or local branch today and find out! There are only happy surprises in store for you when you do.

libraryadvocates:

mylifeinthelibrary:

hatpire:

mylifeinthelibrary:

hatpire:

tamorapierce:

libraryadvocates:

lalie:

The fact that the ALA shared this link is so gloriously bitter and angry and I love it.

Is there a portmanteau for that? Angritter? Bangry? 

Amazon is searching for all kinds of ways to get little chunks of change out of readers, isn’t it?

I actually rather like this plan. The idea of being able to put a new book on my Kindle from anywhere in the world at any time of day (or night) is awesome.

I love paper books and libraries, but I read much more on my Kindle.

Becky, I feel like I should point out that your library allows you to download ebooks to your kindle from anywhere in the world at anytime as well…for free. And your library in particular has two ebook services.

My main complaint with the new Kindle plan is they’re selling it like it includes all ebooks, but it actually only applies to a very small percentage of their offerings. It’s a restricted catalog.

Whaaaaaaaaat.

I am clearly outdated in terms of my library knowledge. I need to get on top of this shit, stat.

Just go to the library’s website, open the side menu* and click on elibrary. It has links to both services there and I think there are instructions you can download as well. If not, I can walk you through it or you can stop in at the library and anyone in adult services will be happy to help.

What services does your library offer that you might not know about? Visit their website or local branch today and find out! There are only happy surprises in store for you when you do.

Tags: libraries

"Commander Vimes didn’t like the phrase ‘The innocent have nothing to fear’, believing the innocent had everything to fear, mostly from the guilty but in the longer term even more from those who say things like ‘The innocent have nothing to fear’."

— Terry Pratchett (via beornwulf)

(Source: theredkite, via ooksaidthelibrarian)

libraryadvocates:

theoria850:

Thinking of using the Night Vale Summer Reading Program theme for our library this year. Our town is small, don’t think anyone else listens. Could be interesting?

Only one way to find out.

libraryadvocates:

theoria850:

Thinking of using the Night Vale Summer Reading Program theme for our library this year. Our town is small, don’t think anyone else listens. Could be interesting?

Only one way to find out.